Science
Thursday, January 28, 2021

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 science gif

There were folks dressed in lab coats and pink knit brain hats. There were costumed characters and festooned pets. And there were many, many signs. Across the nation and abroad, as thousands of scientists and their supporters convened on Earth Day to defend science against proposed government cuts and political interference, many got their messages across with colorful and candid protest signs.  Here are some of the best signs we have seen

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da vinci surgical robot

5G is innovating medicine—connecting surgeons with patients in understaffed hospitals in remote parts of the world and providing a seamless surgical experience for telesurgery. The surgery itself was old hat for Dr. Patel. As Chief Interventional Cardiologist at the Apex Heart institute in Ahmedabad, Patel had performed countless coronary angioplasties, a surgery where a balloon is inserted into the arteries of the heart and inflated to widen the artery and increase blood flow. A small mesh tube, called a stent, is then placed in the artery to keep it from narrowing again.

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 Popo August 2019 Eruption

Scientific examinations of historical accounts suggest that up to 40 percent of Mexico’s population lives along a zone that is more seismically active than suspected. Ash spews from Mexico's Popocatépetl volcano in August 14, 2019 (see above photo). The peak is part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, a region which seismologists say may present a greater earthquake hazard than anticipated. According to the Anales de Tlatelolco, the earth cracked open in central Mexico on February 19, 1575. The ancient codex, composed around the time the Aztec Empire fell to Spanish conquistadors, features a story of a convulsion that lasted for up to five days, creating landslides and opening up a nearly three-mile-long scar in the ground.

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 West Antarctic in red has 002

Glaciers in Antarctica are melting faster and across a much wider area than previously thought, a development that threatens to raise sea levels worldwide and force millions of people to flee low-lying areas, scientists said in Geneva during a recentconference. Researchers once believed that the melting was limited to the Antarctic Peninsula, a narrow tongue of land pointing toward South America. But satellite data and automated weather stations now indicate it is more widespread.

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Night at the Museum Gif

The “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils — Deep Time” exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History opened June 8, 2019 after a five-year renovation.  As a young paleontologist, Kirk Johnson traveled to the Arctic to excavate fossils from 50 million years ago, a time when the air was thick with carbon dioxide and so warm that even the North Pole had no ice. Johnson and his colleagues dug up fossilized crocodiles, turtles, and palm trees. “Palm trees!” Johnson recalled. “In the Arctic! . . . It blew my mind that the Earth could change that much.”