Science

Who's Online?

We have 882 guests and no members online

Saturday, September 26, 2020

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 West Antarctic in red has 002

Glaciers in Antarctica are melting faster and across a much wider area than previously thought, a development that threatens to raise sea levels worldwide and force millions of people to flee low-lying areas, scientists said in Geneva during a recentconference. Researchers once believed that the melting was limited to the Antarctic Peninsula, a narrow tongue of land pointing toward South America. But satellite data and automated weather stations now indicate it is more widespread.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Night at the Museum Gif

The “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils — Deep Time” exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History opened June 8, 2019 after a five-year renovation.  As a young paleontologist, Kirk Johnson traveled to the Arctic to excavate fossils from 50 million years ago, a time when the air was thick with carbon dioxide and so warm that even the North Pole had no ice. Johnson and his colleagues dug up fossilized crocodiles, turtles, and palm trees. “Palm trees!” Johnson recalled. “In the Arctic! . . . It blew my mind that the Earth could change that much.”

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Sexuality two heads kissing 

There is no one gene that determines a person’s sexual orientation, but genetics — along with environment — play a part in shaping sexuality, a massive new study shows. Researchers analyzed DNA from hundreds of thousands of people and found that there are a handful of genes clearly connected with same-sex sexual behavior. The researchers say that, although variations in these genes cannot predict whether a person is gay, these variants may partly influence sexual behavior.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Climate_Marcher

The New York rally was part of a global protest that included events in 156 countries - Afghanistan, the UK, Italy and Brazil among them. In London, the march attracted an estimated 40,000 people, including actress Emma Thompson who likened the threat from climate change to a Martian invasion.  Some 30,000 people marched in Melbourne, Australia. Demonstrators urged Prime Minister Tony Abbott to take action, citing fears that climate change could lead to more bushfires and droughts.Organizers said more than 25,000 marched in Paris and  15,000 people marched in Berlin, urging world leaders to recognize climate change as a top pressing problem.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

  purple octopus

Octopuses have three hearts, parrot-like beaks, venomous bites, and eight semi-autonomous arms that can taste the world. They squirt ink, contort through the tiniest of spaces, and melt into the world by changing both color and texture. They are incredibly intelligent, capable of wielding tools, solving problems, and sabotaging equipment. As Sy Montgomery once wrote, “no sci-fi alien is so startlingly strange” as an octopus. But their disarming otherness doesn’t end with their bodies. Their genes are also really weird.