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Monday, October 26, 2020

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TIM201019 Trump.Covid .Cover .FINAL  

STATE OF THE OUTBREAK

A State by State Interactive Graph

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer are more likely to develop serious illness. The best way to prevent and slow down transmission is be well informed about the COVID-19 virus, the disease it causes and how it spreads. Protect yourself and others from infection by washing your hands or using an alcohol based rub frequently and not touching your face. The COVID-19 virus spreads primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes, so it’s important that you also practice respiratory etiquette (for example, by coughing into a flexed elbow).At this time, there are no specific vaccines or treatments for COVID-19. However, there are many ongoing clinical trials evaluating potential treatments. WHO will continue to provide updated information as soon as clinical findings become available.

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 storm eye and surge

There are several characteristics of the changing climate that are helping to increase the risks of damage from Hurricanes, even though global warming is not directly causing such a storm to spin up.  Katharine Hayhoe, a climate researcher at Texas Tech, put the relationship between climate change and storms such as Florence as follows: "Hurricanes are absolutely being affected by our changing climate, in many ways. As the world warms, the rainfall associated with hurricanes is becoming more intense; they are getting stronger, on average; they are intensifying faster; they are moving more slowly; and, as sea level rises, the storm surge from these events can be more damaging."

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Heart Puszzle 

The first case of COVID-19 in the United States was identified in January of this year. As of the date of this letter, there are over 3 million total confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S., which is roughly the size of the entire population of Puerto Rico. COVID-19 has killed over 135,000 Americans. These are confirmed infections – we are not incentivized to attribute a patient’s death to COVID-19 if the diagnosis is not confirmed with laboratory studies. This pandemic is real, and we are very concerned about it.

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 Bones of MammothsN Mexico City

Last year, archaeologists discovered huge earthen pits dug by humans some 15,000 years ago in an area just north of Mexico City. Inside those pits were the remains of more than a dozen woolly mammoths, some of which showed signs of being butchered. This discovery led researchers to hypothesize that these pits were in fact traps laid by human ancestors to capture huge, prehistoric prey. In 2020,  another mammoth graveyard has been found just six miles away, though archaeologists so far see no signs of human involvement in the demise of the roughly 60 mammoths that have been unearthed.

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 climate change globe

The World is Watching Cities, Now More than Ever. The US withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord brought cities into the spotlight. Because cities and mayors are acting now, and we must be right beside them as they become necessary leaders in this vital cause. As the world moves forward from Paris, we're showcasing stories that help explain why cities are so critically important for implementing on the goals set forth in that historic accord. See the world turning green in support of the Paris Climate Accord and the future of our planet. After the Climate Accord was signed the  road from Paris moved through member cities Beijing for the Second China-U.S. Climate-Smart Low-Carbon Cities Summit; Singapore for the World Cities Summit; Quito for Habitat III; and now culminates in Mexico City for the sixth biennial C40 Mayors Summit and C40 Cities Awards.