Space Exploration
Monday, November 28, 2022

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Four diferent images with X Rays 1 

NASA’s revolutionary, long-delayed $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope has produced its first full-color image, and it’s a doozy: a glimpse deep into space and back in time, capturing the faint light of galaxies forming in the infancy of the cosmos. The image, revealed Monday in a White House ceremony by President Biden and top NASA officials, shows a cluster of galaxies, called SMACS 0723, that functions as a massive lens, magnifying the extremely faint and cosmically distant objects behind it.

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 Artemis Moon Space Launch System

The Space Launch System, with the Orion spacecraft sitting on top, has a central role in the Artemis I mission to orbit the moon.  The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s newest rocket is set to lift off Monday morning, kicking off a new era of lunar exploration for the U.S.  The Artemis I mission is an uncrewed practice run that will launch NASA’s most powerful rocket—called the Space Launch System, or SLS—with the Orion spacecraft sitting on top. Orion is designed to withstand the harsh environment of space.

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Space Telescope 09628 1880x1230 1

NASA’s long-delayed James Webb Space Telescope, a $10 billion marvel of engineering and scientific ambition, is finally poised to rocket into deep space from a launchpad in French Guiana, on the northeast shoulder of South America. What happens in the following days and weeks will either change our understanding of the universe, or deliver a crushing blow to NASA and the global astronomical community. The Webb must cruise for 29 days to a unique orbit around the sun that keeps it roughly 1 million miles from Earth, four times the distance to the moon. At launch, it will be folded upon itself, a shrouded package inside the cone of the European Space Agency’s Ariane 5 rocket. 

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Inspiration4 Logo 

The launch of the first all-civilian mission to orbit scheduled for September 15, 2021,  is an ambitious test for a burgeoning space industry's futuristic dream of sending many more ordinary people to space in the next few years.  Companies and nations envision millions of people living and working in space without having to become professional, government-backed astronauts. Those hopes are riding on SpaceX's next crewed mission, called Inspiration4. Previous launches have taken billionaires to suborbital space or sent space tourists to the International Space Station alongside professional astronauts, but this mission is the first with a crew made up entirely of amateur astronauts.

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moon over water 

Water is a precious resource and a relatively plentiful lunar presence could prove important to future astronaut and robotic missions seeking to extract and utilize water.The moon lacks the bodies of liquid water that are a hallmark of Earth but scientists said on Monday lunar water is more widespread than previously known, with water molecules trapped within mineral grains on the surface and more water perhaps hidden in ice patches residing in permanent shadows. While research 11 years ago indicated water was relatively widespread in small amounts on the moon, a team of scientists is now reporting the first unambiguous detection of water molecules on the lunar surface. At the same time, another team is reporting that the moon possesses roughly 15,000 square miles (40,000 square kilometers) of permanent shadows that potentially could harbor hidden pockets of water in the form of ice.