Science

Who's Online?

We have 540 guests and no members online

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 storm eye and surge

There are several characteristics of the changing climate that are helping to increase the risks of damage from Hurricanes, even though global warming is not directly causing such a storm to spin up.  Katharine Hayhoe, a climate researcher at Texas Tech, put the relationship between climate change and storms such as Florence as follows: "Hurricanes are absolutely being affected by our changing climate, in many ways. As the world warms, the rainfall associated with hurricanes is becoming more intense; they are getting stronger, on average; they are intensifying faster; they are moving more slowly; and, as sea level rises, the storm surge from these events can be more damaging."

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Sexuality two heads kissing 

There is no one gene that determines a person’s sexual orientation, but genetics — along with environment — play a part in shaping sexuality, a massive new study shows. Researchers analyzed DNA from hundreds of thousands of people and found that there are a handful of genes clearly connected with same-sex sexual behavior. The researchers say that, although variations in these genes cannot predict whether a person is gay, these variants may partly influence sexual behavior.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Night at the Museum Gif

The “David H. Koch Hall of Fossils — Deep Time” exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History opened June 8, 2019 after a five-year renovation.  As a young paleontologist, Kirk Johnson traveled to the Arctic to excavate fossils from 50 million years ago, a time when the air was thick with carbon dioxide and so warm that even the North Pole had no ice. Johnson and his colleagues dug up fossilized crocodiles, turtles, and palm trees. “Palm trees!” Johnson recalled. “In the Arctic! . . . It blew my mind that the Earth could change that much.”

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 Misticism

The Seven Wonders of the Natural World may have been named too quickly. Wonders like The Grand Canyon and Victoria Falls are certainly big, and anyone who sees them will surely be impressed—but sheer size isn’t enough to truly leave a person in awe. There are other places in this world, though, that are far stranger. Places that seem almost alien, as if they could only exist on a planet that evolved separately from our own. These are places that scientists have had to struggle just to understand how they ever could have been formed. Places that will truly make you wonder—not just because they’re beautiful, but because they seem to follow scientific laws that don’t exist anywhere else on earth.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Autism and the Israeli Army

Six years ago, three former Mossad agents launched an experimental Israeli Army program to recruit those on the autism spectrum, harnessing their unique aptitudes—their "superpowers," as one soldier puts it. The name of this big military success? Roim Rachok, Hebrew for "seeing into the future," and it may bring neurodiversity to the broader workforce. They’re part of an innovative military program called Roim Rachok, Hebrew for “seeing into the future.” The elite group consists entirely of members of a burgeoning but underserved and overlooked population with powers as special as their needs: autistic teens.