Remembrance

Who's Online?

We have 698 guests and no members online

Saturday, July 20, 2019

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

allan touring

Alan Turing (June 23, 1912 - June 7, 1954) was once a hero in England. He helped the government crack German Codes during World War II and developed the Turning Machine, establishing the framework for today's modern computers and was generally regarded as one of the nation's brightest stars. Then, in 1952, Turing was outed, leading to a very public trial, conviction and chemically castrated for "gross indecency." He killed himself two years later.  Now, 60+ years on, the British government is honoring Turing by including him in a series of twelve new "Britons of Distinction" stamps set to be released to coincide with the year of the 100 anniversary of his birth. George Broadhead, secretary of the Humanist group the Pink Triangle Trust, celebrated Turing's inclusion in a press release. "This is richly deserved," he wrote. "It is well known that Turing was gay, but perhaps not so well known that he was a staunch atheist.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

FDR Memorial Wall Four Freedoms

The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on Monday, January 6, 1941. In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people "everywhere in the world" ought to enjoy:  Freedom of Speach   Freedom of Worship   Freedom from Want   Freedom from Fear.    The first two freedoms, of speech and religion, are protected by the First Amendment in the United States Constitution. His inclusion of the latter two freedoms went beyond the traditional Constitutional values protected by the U.S. Bill of Rights. Roosevelt endorsed a broader human right to economic security and anticipated what would become known decades later as the "human security" paradigm in social science and economic development. He also included the "freedom from fear" against national aggression and took it to the new United Nations he was setting up.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Full Shot Unite Pride NY World 2019

New-York Historical Society commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising and the dawn of the gay liberation movement this summer, as New York City welcomes WorldPride, the largest Pride celebration in the world. Stonewall 50 at New-York Historical Society features two exhibitions and a special installation, as well as public programs for all ages.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Anne Frank Writting Diary

Anne Frank - 12 June 1929 – February 1945:  It was on her 13th birthday that Anne received her first red checkered diary, calling it “maybe one of my nicest presents.” A similar diary was laid on a table along with other gifts — a blue blouse, cold cream, a book, that she described receiving on her birthday. The Frank family hid in the annex for just over two years before being arrested and deported to Nazi-run concentration camps. Anne’s father Otto, the only member of the family to survive the war, later published her diaries. The book went on to be published in dozens of countries around the world and is regarded as one of the most important works of the 20th century.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Screen Shot 2018 04 08 at 2.07.01 PM 

María Félix, the accomplished Mexican film actress who was known for defying stereotypes and famously turning down Hollywood roles, would have turned 104 years-old on Sunday, April 8, 2018.   To celebrate her birthday, Google is honoring her with her own Google Doodle. The Mexican star, who died in April 8,2002 at age 87, acted in more than 47 films in her lifetime and was a muse to famous artists and writers like Diego Rivera and Jean Cocteau. Her incredible career spanned more than three decades. The entire time she “reigned as the supreme goddess of Spanish-language cinema,” according to her New York Times obituary.