Inventions

Who's Online?

We have 1662 guests and no members online

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

A sun-powered cooker, a printer that 3D prints "skin", a wheelchair that lets disabled people stand upright and a bee prober are among the latest winners of the James Dyson Awards. The inventions are among those picked to represent various nations in the engineering prize. Their makers were challenged to "design something that solves a problem" More than 600 entries from 18 countries were entered into this year's competition. It was open to university level students and recent graduates.

Awards_Dyson_Mr_Roberts_winning

James Dyson Awarding James Roberts

The contest is run by the James Dyson Foundation, a charity created by the vacuum cleaner creator to help young people develop engineering skills. "The James Dyson Award provides a platform to showcase some of the very best new innovations in science, engineering and technology," said Dr William Webb, deputy president of the Institution of Engineering and Technology adding that "while some of the entries might not make it beyond the prototype stage, the award provides a crucial role in encouraging new engineering talent, which the UK and other countries around the world so desperately need."

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

The DARPA Robotics Challenge(DRC) is a prize competition funded by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.  The competition involves robot systems and software teams vying to develop robots capable of assisting humans in responding to natural and man-made disasters. It was designed to be extremely difficult.

ReliefCHIMP-cutout-3_0

Carnegie Mellon University: CHIMP

Participating teams, representing some of the most advanced robotics research and development organizations in the world, are collaborating and innovating on a very short timeline to develop the hardware, software, sensors, and human-machine control interfaces that will enable their robots to complete a series of challenge tasks selected by DARPA for their relevance to disaster response. The DRC Finals will take place from June 5-6, 2015 at Fairplex in Pomona, California.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Researchers at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a robot that can fold itself up from a flat sheet into a beetle-like, four-legged walking form.  

robot_origami_transformer_inline01_630

It's not the first folding robot: Some of the same engineers and mathematicians who collaborated on this one have built other origami robots, including robotic bees. This one, however, is the first to be able to fold itself rather than being folded by a person. The innovation raise the potential of robots that can be stacked compactly, like so many mouse pads, and then flown into hostile environments—either battlefields or other planets—where they then can be left to self-assemble.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Traditional Operating Rooms are inefficient and overcrowded. Patient data are not integrated and displayed to caregivers in a timely fashion,   and turnover time between cases is lengthy. Technologies designed to impact procedural medicine are often introduced in isolation, usually failing to improve efficiency and safety, or reduce costs.

operating-room-of-the-future-300x300

Devices are often haphazardly introduced into a technologically complex environment. Integrating high technology components, however, is not   sufficient to achieve the goal of better patient care; teamwork and communication in a high tech environment is equally essential. To address many of these problems, CIMIT pioneered the MGH "Operating Room of the Future" (ORF) project.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

The technological singularity is the hypothetical future emergence of greater-than-human super intelligence through technological means. By promoting the "truth" of its coming through predictions that seem remarkable at the time but inevitable after the fact (a global computer network, a computer beating the chess champion, etc.), Ray Kurzweil's popular series of books reinforces the belief that a singularity is unavoidable.

singularity1

Ramona Modifies Her Own Code

The difficult thing to keep sight of when you're talking about the Singularity is that even though it sounds like science fiction, it isn't, no more than a weather forecast is science fiction. It's not a fringe idea; it's a serious hypothesis about the future of life on Earth. There's an intellectual gag reflex that kicks in anytime you try to swallow an idea that involves super-intelligent immortal cyborgs, but suppress it if you can, because while the Singularity appears to be, on the face of it, preposterous, it's an idea that rewards sober, careful evaluation.