Remembrance

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Friday, September 20, 2019

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The Soviets liberated Auschwitz, the largest killing center and concentration camp, in January 1945. The Nazis had forced the majority of Auschwitz prisoners to march westward (in what would become known as "death marches"), and Soviet soldiers found only several thousand emaciated prisoners alive when they entered the camp.

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Stalin, Roosevelt, Churchill

There was abundant evidence of mass murder in Auschwitz. The retreating Germans had destroyed most of the warehouses in the camp, but in the remaining ones the Soviets found personal belongings of the victims. They discovered hundreds of thousands of men's suits, more than 800,000 women's outfits, and more than 14,000 pounds of human hair.

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Among the dozen deaths in the terrorist attack on the Paris office of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo was its editor and principal cartoonist, Stéphane Charbonnier, who built his career on defiance and the right to insult religion. Editor firmly stood behind his staff's right to free speech, even when it was ridiculed as provocation.  Additional shootdowns occured in a Kosher Market where four people were killed and at a gas station where a police woman was shot to death.

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In Loving Memory

Click to See: Cartoon Artists Response

As Charlie Hebdo's journalists, the police who tried to protect them and otheer inocent victims lay dead in Paris, editors around the world were suddenly confronted with a grave decision. Should they mark their solidarity with their colleagues – and their fidelity to freedom of expression – by publishing the cartoons the assailants claim had provoked them? Should they instead consider the concern of offending their own readers and even the safety of their staff?

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Roberto Gómez Bolaños  

February 21, 1929 – November 28, 2014

More commonly known by his pseudonym Chespirito, Roberto Gómez Bolaños was a Mexican screenwriter, actor, comedian, film director, television director, playwright, songwriter, and author. He is widely regarded as one of the most important Spanish-language comedians of the 20th century.  He was internationally known for writing, directing, and starring in the Chespirito (1968), El Chavo del Ocho (1971), and El Chapulín Colorado (1972) television series. The character of El Chavo is one of the most iconic in the history of Latin American television, and El Chavo del Ocho continues to be immensely popular, with daily worldwide viewership averaging 91 million viewers per episode in 124 countries.

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Remembrance Day (also known as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed in British Commonwealth of Nations member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty.

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The day, specifically designated by King George V on November 7, 1919, or alternative dates, are also recognized as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on November 11, to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month."

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Lauren Bacall

September 16, 1924 – August 12, 2014 

She first emerged as a leading lady in the Humphrey Bogart film To Have and Have Not (1944) and continued on in the film noir genre, with appearances in Bogart movies The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948), as well as comedic roles in How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) with Marilyn Monroe and Designing Woman (1957) with Gregory Peck. Bacall worked on Broadway in musicals, earning Tony Awards for Applause in 1970 and Woman of the Year in 1981. Her performance in the movie The Mirror Has Two Faces (1996) earned her a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award nomination.  Lauren Bacall was an American film and stage actress and model, known for her distinctive husky voice and sultry looks.