Remembrance
Wednesday, January 26, 2022

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 New Zealand Crying

New Zealand Picks Up the Pieces After the Worst Massacre in Its History.  New Zealand’s low-slung second city was cloaked in mourning, shops shuttered and residents zombified, struggling to comprehend the mass shooting that claimed 50 lives — the worst massacre in the history of this nation of five million. Police continued to sweep for evidence outside the Al Noor mosque, where a lone gunman killed 41 people, live-streaming his barbarous crimes in ghastly detail. Seven more people were gunned down at a mosque on the other side of the city in the suburban Linwood neighborhood. One more died in hospital, where another 48 wounded are still receiving care, two in a critical condition. Children are among them.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Aristedes de Sousa Mendes

Anyone who has seen “Casablanca” knows the connection between Portugal and World War II refugees. But few know the story of the Portuguese diplomat Aristides de Sousa Mendes, who in 1940 saved tens of thousands of lives only to be punished for this heroism by his own government. As we mark Holocaust Remembrance Day on Sunday, we should honor this man who engaged in what one historian called “perhaps the largest rescue action by a single individual during the Holocaust.”

 

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 Screen Shot 2017 06 06 at 12.14.24 PM

Architect Zaha Hadid captured the world's attention and shattered glass ceilings (in addition to designing some) by becoming the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004. She was also the first woman awarded the Royal Gold Medal by the Royal Institute of British Architects. ​Initially dubbed the “paper architect”, Dame Zaha Hadid’s plans were once perceived to be unbuildable. She died in London at the age of 65 of a heart attack in March of 2016.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

90th Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade POSTER 

To commemorate the multicultural harvest feast of 1621 at Plymouth Rock, about three million New Yorkers and visitors annually station themselves on freezing late-November streets to watch giant inflatable branded cartoon characters, all promoting a department store that filed for bankruptcy protection more than 25 years ago. Something like that. More than 40 million people watch it on television. Even compared to eating turkey, a dish that few people truly make well, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, now in its 92nd year, is a bit of a head-scratcher.  See historic photographies from the New York Times coverage.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 young jewish kids

Thousands of people gathered in front of the Pittsburgh synagogue in Squirrel Hill where 11 people were killed and others injured after a man allegedly opened fire during services Saturday morning. To pay tribute to the lives that were lost, the mourners crowded the street fronting the Tree of Life synagogue, holding candles, singing songs and pleading silently with signs to end the hate and violence. While the Squirrel Hill neighborhood has attracted a diverse range of residents in recent years, it remains a historic hub for Pittsburgh’s Jewish population. Drew Barkley, the executive director of the nearby synagogue Temple Sinai, told Time magazine on Saturday that the community is tight-knit. “The sad part is that people are waiting to find out who the dead are because it’s such a close-knit community there’s like one degree of separation and chances are everyone will know at least one person who died,” Barkley said.