Remembrance
Monday, November 28, 2022

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 9a765ec2 3e93 46e0 ac80 3b3f9cc237ad

A France in Turmoil Weeps for a Symbol of Paris’s Enduring Identity. For centuries, Notre-Dame cathedral has enshrined an evolving notion of what it means to be French. As smoke and flames wafted into the sky on Monday, the symbolism was hard to miss. Notre-Dame has occupied the heart of Paris for the better part of a millennium, its twin medieval towers rising from the small central island wedged between the storied left and right banks. Now, France is burning.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 New Zealand Crying

New Zealand Picks Up the Pieces After the Worst Massacre in Its History.  New Zealand’s low-slung second city was cloaked in mourning, shops shuttered and residents zombified, struggling to comprehend the mass shooting that claimed 50 lives — the worst massacre in the history of this nation of five million. Police continued to sweep for evidence outside the Al Noor mosque, where a lone gunman killed 41 people, live-streaming his barbarous crimes in ghastly detail. Seven more people were gunned down at a mosque on the other side of the city in the suburban Linwood neighborhood. One more died in hospital, where another 48 wounded are still receiving care, two in a critical condition. Children are among them.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Aristedes de Sousa Mendes

Anyone who has seen “Casablanca” knows the connection between Portugal and World War II refugees. But few know the story of the Portuguese diplomat Aristides de Sousa Mendes, who in 1940 saved tens of thousands of lives only to be punished for this heroism by his own government. As we mark Holocaust Remembrance Day on Sunday, we should honor this man who engaged in what one historian called “perhaps the largest rescue action by a single individual during the Holocaust.”

 

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 Screen Shot 2017 06 06 at 12.14.24 PM

Architect Zaha Hadid captured the world's attention and shattered glass ceilings (in addition to designing some) by becoming the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004. She was also the first woman awarded the Royal Gold Medal by the Royal Institute of British Architects. ​Initially dubbed the “paper architect”, Dame Zaha Hadid’s plans were once perceived to be unbuildable. She died in London at the age of 65 of a heart attack in March of 2016.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

90th Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade POSTER 

To commemorate the multicultural harvest feast of 1621 at Plymouth Rock, about three million New Yorkers and visitors annually station themselves on freezing late-November streets to watch giant inflatable branded cartoon characters, all promoting a department store that filed for bankruptcy protection more than 25 years ago. Something like that. More than 40 million people watch it on television. Even compared to eating turkey, a dish that few people truly make well, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, now in its 92nd year, is a bit of a head-scratcher.  See historic photographies from the New York Times coverage.