Remembrance

Who's Online?

We have 400 guests and no members online

Thursday, November 14, 2019

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 Screen Shot 2017 06 06 at 12.14.24 PM

Architect Zaha Hadid captured the world's attention and shattered glass ceilings (in addition to designing some) by becoming the first woman to win the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004. She was also the first woman awarded the Royal Gold Medal by the Royal Institute of British Architects. ​Initially dubbed the “paper architect”, Dame Zaha Hadid’s plans were once perceived to be unbuildable. She died in London at the age of 65 of a heart attack in March of 2016.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Fredy Hirsch

The name of Fredy Hirsch is inseparably connected with the education of children and young people in the Terezín ghetto, and finally in the "family camp“ at Birkenau. In particular, the "children's block,“ established on Hirsch's initiative in the BIIb section of the Birkenau camp, was a remarkable attempt to create a small oasis within the death camp. Its main purpose was to ensure that Auschwitz's youngest prisoners had, at least for a short while, a more tolerable environment in which they would be isolated from the tragic reality around them.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

90th Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade POSTER 

To commemorate the multicultural harvest feast of 1621 at Plymouth Rock, about three million New Yorkers and visitors annually station themselves on freezing late-November streets to watch giant inflatable branded cartoon characters, all promoting a department store that filed for bankruptcy protection more than 25 years ago. Something like that. More than 40 million people watch it on television. Even compared to eating turkey, a dish that few people truly make well, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, now in its 92nd year, is a bit of a head-scratcher.  See historic photographies from the New York Times coverage.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 young jewish kids

Thousands of people gathered in front of the Pittsburgh synagogue in Squirrel Hill where 11 people were killed and others injured after a man allegedly opened fire during services Saturday morning. To pay tribute to the lives that were lost, the mourners crowded the street fronting the Tree of Life synagogue, holding candles, singing songs and pleading silently with signs to end the hate and violence. While the Squirrel Hill neighborhood has attracted a diverse range of residents in recent years, it remains a historic hub for Pittsburgh’s Jewish population. Drew Barkley, the executive director of the nearby synagogue Temple Sinai, told Time magazine on Saturday that the community is tight-knit. “The sad part is that people are waiting to find out who the dead are because it’s such a close-knit community there’s like one degree of separation and chances are everyone will know at least one person who died,” Barkley said.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Memorial from under 2 

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, located in Montgomery, Alabama is the nation’s first memorial dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence. Set on a six-acre site, the memorial uses sculpture, art, and design to contextualize racial terror. The site includes a memorial square with 800 six-foot monuments to symbolize thousands of racial terror lynching victims in the United States and the counties and states where this terrorism took place.