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The winners of the 72nd Golden Globe Awards for achievement in film and television were announced on Sunday, January 11, 2015 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles and aired live on the NBC Network. 

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Hosts Tina Fay and Amy Poehler

"Boyhood" was the biggest winner of the night with three 2015 Golden Globe Awards: Best Motion Picture, Drama;  Best Supporting Actress (Patricia Arquette); and,  Best Director, Motion Picture (Richard Linklater).  Best Actor for a Motion Picture, Drama was awarded to Eddie Redmayne for the "The Theory of Everything" and Julianne Moore won Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama for "Still Alice." Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy went to "The Grand Budapest Hotel,"  Michael Keaton won Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical for "The Birdman," and Amy Adams Best Actress for a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy for "Big Eyes." Russia's "Leviathan" won Best Foreign Language Film and George Clooney received the coveted Cecil B. DeMille Award.

On Monday, August 25, 2014, The Television Academy awarded the 66th Primetime Emmy® Awards from the Nokia Theatre L.A. LIVE in Los Angeles for programming which aired during the 2013-2014 season. Hosted by Seth Meyers, the 66th Emmy Awards ceremony presented the coveted statuette in 26 categories and was telecast live on NBC. In addition, Emmys in 80 other categories for programs and individual achievements were presented at the Creative Arts Awards on August 16, 2014, also from the Nokia Theatre.

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Click Here:Top Nominated Show Trailers

HBO was the top winner with 19 Academy Awards followed by CBS and PBS wioth 11 EMMYs respectively.

In a triumph long deferred, "12 Years a Slave" won the best picture Oscar at the 86th Academy Awards on Sunday night, the first time Hollywood conferred its top honor to the work of a black director.

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"I'd like to thank this amazing story," said Steve McQueen, the British-born filmmaker who grasped a prize that has eluded African-American directors and their movies since the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences gave its first Oscars in 1929.

"Everyone deserves not just to survive, but to live," said Mr. McQueen, who dedicated the film to those who had endured slavery, both in the past and in the present.  Only minutes before, Mr. McQueen had been overlooked for the directing award, which went to Alfonso Cuarón for "Gravity," a 3-D blockbuster whose story of survival in space had been locked with Mr. McQueen's film and David O. Russell's "American Hustle" in a ferocious contest for the best picture statuette.

Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder" won top honors at the Tony Awards on Sunday, taking home the prize for best musical.  The award for revival of a musical went to "Hedwig and the Angy Inch," with stars Neil Patrick Harris and Lena Hall also taking home awards. "All the Way" and "A Raisin in the Sun" won in the play categories.

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Hugh Jackman  

Other winners included Audra McDonald, who won her sixth Tony for her role in "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill," Bryan Cranston for lead actor in the play "All the Way" and Jessie Mueller for lead actress in "Beautiful -- The Carole King Musical."  The 68th Tony Awards hosted by Hugh Jackman were held at Radio City Music Hall in New York. The complete list of nominees and winners are below.

Created and narrated by Rod Serling, the original series "The Twilight Zone" which aired on CBS from October 2,1959 through June 19, 1964, included 156 episodes. The music theme was composed by Gregor F. Narholz. The series had two revivals which also aired on CBS. The first included 75 episodes and ran on CBS from 1985 to 1989, with a second revival with 44 original episodes which aired on UPN from 2002 to 2003. The series is still running in sindication and can be seen on the SyFy channel.

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Each of the 156 episodes of the original series is a mixture of self-contained drama, psychological thriller, fantasy, science fiction, suspense, or horror, often concluding with a macabre or unexpected twist. A popular and critical success, it introduced many Americans to serious science fiction and abstract ideas through television and also through a wide variety of Twilight Zone literature.