Space Exploration

Who's Online?

We have 446 guests and no members online

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

This image, captured on November 27, 2012 by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, stares into the storm's sinister eye from 361,000 kilometres away. The spacecraft observed in infrared wavelengths, which can peer through the top layer of clouds to reveal the complex texture beneath.

saturn_superstorm1

In 2007, the Cassini team saw a huge hexagon-shaped structure about 25,000 kilometres across stretching over Saturn's north pole. But the planet was in the depths of its 15-year-long winter, when sunlight does not fall on the pole, and it was too dark to see what lurked within the structure. Spring lifted the gloom in 2009, and now the team has spotted this vast storm at the hexagon's core.

 

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

In a secret project recently discovered, the US planned to blow up the moon. It may sound like a plot straight out of a science fiction novel, but a U.S. mission to blow up the moon with a nuke was very real in the 1950s.

how-the-us-planned-to-blow-up-the-moon-300x175

At the height of the space race, the U.S. considered detonating an atom bomb on the moon as a display of America's Cold War muscle. The secret project, innocuously titled 'A Study of Lunar Research Flights' and nicknamed 'Project A119,' was never carried out. In a secret project recently discovered, the United States planned to blow up the moon with a nuclear bomb in the 1950s as a display of the country's strength during the Cold War space race.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

HORRENDOUS and damaging as it was, Hurricane Sandy would be considered only an opening act compared with a powerful "once-in-a-century" solar storm. 

solar_storm_warning_nasa_2012

These storms of charged particles and magnetic fields are unleashed periodically by the Sun and — if headed toward Earth — can cause havoc with satellites and the electricity grid. Unlike with Sandy, we are woefully underprepared both to detect such impending storms and to respond to them. Although they can come at any time, their likelihood waxes and wanes in 11-year cycles — with the next period of maximum activity being next year.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

It was expected to be just another lump of dull basalt, but the first rock examined up close by NASA's Mars rover proved to be a little more interesting.  The pyramidal object, nicknamed "Jake Matijevic" after a recently deceased mission engineer, had a composition not seen on the planet before.  Scientists have likened it to some unusual but well known rocks on Earth.

rover_finds_rock_1

These form from relatively water-rich magmas that have cooled slowly at raised pressures and it is widespread available on Earth, on oceanic islands such as Hawaii, and St Helena, and the Azores; and also in rift zones like the Rio Grande and so forth. So, again, it's not common, but it's very well known," the mission co-investigator from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, told reporters.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has touched down on the surface of the Red Planet, completing a 154-million-mile journey, and marking the beginning of a new era in planetary exploration.  President Obama released the following statement immediately after the landing: In the early morning of August 6, 2012, on the planet Mars, the United States of America made history.

mars_panoramic_views

Click Here for a Virtual Tour of Mars

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has touched down on the surface of the Red Planet, completing a 154-million-mile journey, and marking the beginning of a new era in planetary exploration.We can now see panoramic images of Mars (above).