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Friday, June 23, 2017

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Ballerina profile

A massive inflatable ballerina created by artist Jeff Koons is the latest public art installation at New York's Rockefeller Center. The 45-foot (14-meter) work is called "Seated Ballerina." It was unveiled Friday and will be on display through June 2. The nylon sculpture is based on a porcelain figurine of a ballerina in a blue tutu.

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Park11

Loveland is an outdoor sculpture park which opened in 2004 on Jeju Island in South Korea. The park is focused on a theme of sex, running sex education films, and featuring 140 sculptures representing humans in various sexual positions. It also has other elements such as large phallus statues, stone labia, and hands-on exhibits such as a "masturbation-cycle." The park's website describes the location as "a place where love oriented art and eroticism meet."

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Warren_Sexual_Explosion

Awesome beauty aside, "Sexual Explosion" has finally secured its place in Modern Contemporary Art History along with the other world-famous nudes of Picasso, Dali and Modigliani. Jim Warren's "Sexual Explosion" phenomena has influenced a whole new generation of surreal artists portraying the nude image. Because of "Sexual Explosion's" daring visuals and sensuous seduction and its liberating mystical imagery, the Warren masterpiece has achieved international respect and praise at last. 

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 Guggenheim Side Shot

Twenty years ago, Bilbao was scarred by acts of terrorism and failing industry. The city decided to gamble on Frank Gehry's Guggenheim Museum. Not only did it help to save Bilbao, it also showed the world the transformative effect of art.

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  Refugees Welcome 2

The United States has debated immigration since the country's founding, and the Statue of Liberty—a potent symbol for immigrants—is often invoked as an argument for why we should usher in those who seek safety and opportunity with open arms. A little-known fact about Lady Liberty adds an intriguing twist to today's debate about refugees from the Muslim world: according to the Smithsonian Institute the statue itself was originally intended to represent a female Egyptian peasant as a Colossus of Rhodes for the Industrial Age. That might be surprising to people more familiar with the statue’s French roots than its Arab ones.